By Komal Ahmed

It is merely a picture. An image shows five mothers standing in the courtyard of Loghman Hospital while Behnam Mahjoubi, a dervish who passed away on a ventilator after eight months of abuse in prison, was counting down the minutes of his life.

Batoul Hosseini, who is curled up in a blanket and sobbing in the arms of the other mothers, is the one who is currently experiencing the most pain. “Why did they take my baby away from me?” she cries out.

From the mothers of Khavaran, whose lawsuit never saw the light of day, to all the flag-bearing mothers around the world seeking justice, this one photograph tells the story of more than 40 years of persecution, murder, and execution.


The human rights situation in Iran has been widely criticized by many organizations, including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch.

One area of concern is the treatment of political prisoners, including the arrest and detention of peaceful activists and protesters.


Many mothers have been protesting for years, demanding for the release of their arrested children who were arrested for peaceful activism and protesting.

Many of them have been arrested and imprisoned for years without fair trial, and mothers, along with other families, have been struggling to see them or obtain information about their condition.

When mothers in Iran have their sons arrested for participating in political movements or protests, it can be an extremely difficult and traumatic experience. The mothers may feel a sense of helplessness, as they are often unable to do much to secure their son’s release or ensure their well-being in detention.

They may also experience feelings of guilt and shame, as they may feel that they have failed to protect their child from harm.

Many mothers in this situation become active in campaigning for their son’s release and the release of other political prisoners.

They may join groups of other mothers who have also had children arrested, and they may participate in protests and other forms of activism to raise awareness about their situation.

There are many examples of mothers in Iran who have had their sons arrested for participating in political movements or protests, and who have subsequently become active in campaigning for their release.

One example is the “Mothers of Laleh Park,” a group of mothers who have had children arrested in connection with the 2009 Green Movement protests in Iran. The group holds regular protests in Laleh Park in Tehran, demanding the release of their children and other political prisoners. They have faced harassment and intimidation from the authorities for their activism.

Another example is the “Mothers of Khavaran,” a group of mothers whose children were executed in the 1980s for their political views. The group holds regular memorials for their children and campaigns for justice for the victims of the executions.

There is also the example of “Nasrin Sotoudeh” a human rights lawyer and mother of two, who was arrested in 2018 for her human rights activism, including her defense of women’s rights activists and her opposition to the mandatory hijab law in Iran. She was sentenced to 38 years in prison and 148 lashes.

Her arrest and sentence drew international condemnation, and her husband and children were also targeted by the authorities.

These are just a few examples of the many mothers in Iran who have had their sons arrested for political reasons and have become active in campaigning for their release and the release of other political prisoners.

Their activism shines a light on the ongoing human rights abuses in the country and the importance of protecting the rights of peaceful protesters and political activists.

Further I can tell you that the human rights situation in Iran continues to be a concern for many organizations and activists.

There have been reports of arbitrary arrests, detention of political prisoners, and restrictions on freedom of speech, press and assembly.

It is likely that there are still many mothers in Iran who have had their sons arrested for political reasons and who continue to campaign for their release and the release of other political prisoners.

It’s important to note that media censorship and lack of access to independent sources of information make it difficult to know the scale of the situation and the exact numbers of political prisoners, and the situation might have changed since my knowledge cutoff.